Lists

Authors I Have a Love-and-Hate Relationship With

Hello everyone! How are you all doing? My exams are going on, (and technically I shouldn’t be using my laptop but oh well) and I’m sorry I haven’t been posting a lot; I’ve just been busy with studies and yeah, studies. Just that. [*changes the topic before this post gets any more depressing*]

I thought I’d do a random little list today! I was wracking my brains to come up with a topic (either for a discussion, or a list post) when I finally thought that maybe I could work on ‘Authors I Both Love and Hate’.  So these authors are basically authors, whose few books I have loved, and few I have hated. Am I going to read more books by them? Yes, probably, for the sake of trying out new stuff. But will they be on the top of my priority list? Most definitely not.

//All opinions are mine, and not intended to offend anyone.


Rainbow Rowell

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I’ve read most of her books, and pretty much divided in my opinion of her. Whereas I thoroughly enjoyed Fangirl and wept for and laughed at and adored Eleanor and Park, I was extremely udnerwhelmed by Attachments and DNF’d Landline. Fangirl was this realistic, coming-of-age story about growing out of your shell and discovering a new side to your self, whereas Eleanor and Park was this heartbreaking tale of first love. Attachments, on the other hand, I thought lacked in depth and Landline was just pure rubbish. I would definitely like to try out her other books, but I’d probably research a lot and only then decide to invest my time into something else by her.

Neil Gaiman

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The Ocean at the End of the Lane is probably one of the worst books I’ve read in the last 2-3 years. That book was so bad. I read halfway through Neverwhere, and it was super exciting, but something happened midway (something which aggravated my phobia of birds) and I stopped reading immediately. Nevertheless, it was exciting and amazing. I even read The Graveyeard Book, which I thought was interesting and impactful. So I do know that he has in him excellent story-telling and writing skills, but the horror of reading The Ocean at the End of the Lane has stayed with me ever since, and I’m definitely hesitant of picking up any of his other books. (The one which really interests me is American Gods. Any thoughts on that book?)

John Green

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Of course he had to be on this list. I loved Looking for Alaska and really liked The Fault in Our Stars too, but hugely disliked Paper Towns and DNF’d An Abundance of Katherines. I don’t know what it is about his books, but every book portrays a similar guy and a similar girl and similar themes and it isn’t working out at all. I don’t think any other John Green book wilk ever excite me anymore, though I might just pick up one out of pure curiosity. I’d just rather remember him as the author of LFA and TFiOS and cherish those two books forever.

Veronica Roth

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Divergent was amazing, absolutely. That has probably to do with me having read extremely few dysopian novels at the time I read this trilogy, but nevertheless, I remember being dazed by the splendid first book in the Divergent trilogyInsurgent disappointed and irritated me, and I don’t even want to go into the whole matter of Allegiant. However, I cannot overlook the fact that she did write Divergent, and created such an amazing concept and world. I’m not exactly super-excited for her new book (Carve the Mark) but would probably only read it if I have a lot of free time (which I don’t) and don’t have other important books to get to (which I do). So clearly, I’m not reading it anytime soon.

Richelle Mead

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I loved Vampire Academy, DNF’d Bloodlines, and absolutely hated (and probably even DNF’d) The Glittering Court. Yet, I still do love Richelle Mead, nevertheless. It involves one of my fondest memories of reading in childhood, about vampires and romance and fighting. I’d probably hate it if I read it now, but my sentimentality attached to this book is huge.


So that was my short list of authors I have a love-and-hate relationship with!

Have you read any books by these authors? Share some of your love-and-hate authors!

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20 thoughts on “Authors I Have a Love-and-Hate Relationship With

    1. Exactly me too. It’s such a well-loved book and (I think) has won quite a few awards too. I somehow don’t get how so many ppl considered this book touching and impactful and emotional – I feel like I read a completely different book!

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        1. Haha yes I too was confused the whole time! I probably wouldn’t be able to tell you what the story is about :P Also, I was kinda grossed out by the fantasy elements – it was weird and creepy. Yikes.

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  1. I actually really loved the ocean at the end of the lane. And it was one of my favourite books last year. And I DNFed American gods. But seeing how you hated what I loved maybe you’ll love American gods? Isn’t the movie coming out soon or something?

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  2. I totally agree with you about John Green and Veronica Roth. Green’s books are all basically the same simple-boy-fixes-complex-girl so after the first couple it feels a bit been there, done that. The Fault in Our Stars was phenomenal though! And I loved Divergent but hated the rest of the series. I liked her short story in Summer Days and Summer Nights though.
    A love-hate author for me is probably Sarah J Maas (I know a lot of people won’t agree) I loved Throne of Glass and Crown of Midnight and the novella collection was great too but I really didn’t like Heir of Fire or Queen of Shadows. Now Empire of Shadows is out but it’s so not on my priority list!

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    1. John Green books kinda have the same formula..and he just needs to change it. I can’t figure out how some people keep loving the same thing repeatedly. I haven’t yet read Roth’s short story – though I want to. I know a lot of people feel that way about SJM :D

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      1. Yeah, when you’re giving recommendations to someone who enjoyed a John Green book, you can just tell them to read the others cos they’re essentially the same in different settings :P I like his writing style but the stories are repetitive.
        BTW, best of luck for your exams! :)

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      2. While recommending books to someone who likes John Green books, you should just tell them about his other novels cos they’re essentially the same :P I like his writing style but the stories are repetitive.
        Btw, best of luck for your exams! :)

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  3. I want to love Neil Gaiman and part of me really does, but I totally feel you on Ocean. I didn’t love love it, and both graveyard book and coraline were underwhelming for me writing/plot wise, but the world building and concept were very cool. Coraline is one of the rare instances where I think the movie was better than the book… that doesn’t happen too often and I don’t think it bodes well 😳

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    1. Yes his world-building is cool (especially since I’ve read half of Neverwhere, and the world in that was amazing) but somehow I completely missed it in Ocean. I loved The Graveyard Book because I don’t enjoy a lot of children’s fiction, and that book was better than most MG I’ve read, so I instantly fell in love with it! I kinda was interested in Coraline when I rad TGB, but slowly lost interest.

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    1. Firstly, I went into the book with extremely high expectations. I had heard from so many people that that book was life-changing, beautiful, masterpiece etc. I think having such high expectations further aggravated my dislike. The main thing I disliked was the fantasy element. I found most of it kinda gross, and I couldn’t understand what was going on. Read my review here : https://goingthroughbooks.wordpress.com/2016/04/20/the-ocean-at-the-end-of-the-lane-neil-gaiman-book-review/
      And yes, I’ll definitely read American Gods!

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  4. Forgot to add – totally agree with you about John Green btw. I have a friend whose mother died of lung and liver cancer, and who really, really despised TFIOS because she felt that the characters’ illnesses were trivialized as springboards for the romance story.

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